Justin Trudeau Says Profiling Incident On Parliament Hill Shows That Racism Exists

HALIFAX — Justin Trudeau told an audience of African Nova Scotians on Thursday that an incident of apparent racial profiling on Parliament Hill shows that racism, unconscious bias and systemic discrimination still can emerge anywhere in Canada.

The prime minister was referring to an incident this month during a lobbying event called Black Voices on the Hill, where several young participants have said they were referred to as "dark-skinned people" and asked to leave a parliamentary cafeteria by a security guard.

"A group of young people ... faced discrimination and marginalization," Trudeau said during an event at the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia in Cherry Brook, a suburb of Halifax with a large African Nova Scotian population.

"They faced a stark reminder that even in that one place that should be theirs ... that anti-black racism exists, that unconscious bias exists, that systemic discrimination exists in this country today."

Trayvone Clayton, a Halifax student who said he was racially profiled, met with Trudeau ahead of the event to discuss the incident.

"We all had our say," he told reporters of the 30-minute meeting with the prime minister. "We respect his apology."

Clayton, in his second year at Saint Mary's University, said he was "very hurt" by the incident.

"We should be accepted for who we are, and what we do. We should not be turned down just because of our skin colour."

The Federation of Black Canadians said several participants in a Feb. 4 event in Ottawa were asked to wait in the parliamentary cafeteria ahead of meetings with cabinet ministers.

The federation said a security guard referred to their skin colour and requested their departure, despite rules that allow civilians with the appropriate passes to be in the area.

The Parliamentary Protective Service apologized at the time of the incident and has said the force was investigating.

In the House of Commons on Tuesday, Speaker Geoff Regan called the service's apology a welcome first step, but said it shouldn't be seen as closing the issue or as a way to erase the unacceptable reality of what occurred.

Meanwhile, Trudeau told a large audience on Thursday that it was particularly worrying that such an incident would occur during African Heritage Month in a public building that belongs to all Canadians.

"We still have a country where discrimination based on the colour of a person's skin is all too common," he said. "We have much, much work to do."

Trudeau — the first sitting prime minister to visit the black cultural centre — praised its role in preserving the history of the province's black residents.

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